OCLW Seminar: Lyndsey Jenkins, ‘The Hunger Games: Constance Lytton, Jane Warton and the Suffragettes’

The Oxford Centre for Life Writing had the pleasure to host one of its own DPhil scholars, Lyndsey Jenkins, who gave a presentation on Lady Constance Lytton, the subject of her new book Lady Constance Lytton: Aristocrat, Suffragette and Martyr.

In 1910 a working class suffragette by the name of Jane Warton was arrested for throwing rocks at an MP’s car, but the police who took her into custody did not know that Jane Warton was actually Lady Constance Lytton in disguise. Lyndsey captured her audience with an excerpt from Warton’s account of being force-fed in jail to put an end to her hunger strike. The testimony detailed how a tube was forced down her throat, how she was slapped and left covered in her own vomit as she had to listen how a friend endured the same procedure next to her. After experiencing this eight times, Warton’s true identity was discovered and she was promptly released from jail. Lyndsey explained that the fundamental question she had set out to answer was why a woman of Lytton’s position and privilege would knowingly choose to put herself in such a dramatic situation.

Lyndsey gave us a brief overview of Lytton’s ancestors in an attempt to identify what it could have been like to be a Lytton. Showcasing various prominent individuals from late Victorian and early Edwardian society, Lyndsey emphasised that the Lytton family had long been made up of strong personalities. Lytton, by contrast shy and awkward, was unsuited for the public and social life of her surroundings, turning instead to book reviewing and caring for her mother. When she did not marry, her life became essentially a private one. Lyndsey explained Lytton’s self-denial by informing us of her favourite ‘pass time’: cleaning the toilet. While outwardly she appeared the model of the dutiful Edwardian daughter, inwardly it seems unlikely that she experienced life in that way.

Lytton had her first encounter with suffragettes while on holiday, meeting Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence and Annie Kenney. While she sympathized with their cause, Lyndsey argued that she became a militant for three main reasons: to establish friendships, to develop a sense of purpose, and for the ‘total excitement’ of the experience. It was also a way to connect her private frustrations to a broader problem. But public life was a challenge since she did not like being looked at or being listened to. It is striking that, in spite of this, her public acts were often radical. There are accounts that on her first day at Holloway Prison she carved a ‘V’ for Votes for Women on her own body. Determined to go to prison and experience force feeding, Lytton came up with a fake name knowing that they would not let such a well-known individual as herself be subjected to that kind of procedure. Lyndsey noted how this experience was also deeply spiritual for Lytton, who once saw a vision of Christ encouraging her to continue with her work. Lyndsey argued that her constructed identity as Jane Warton helped her perform her new leadership role. The brutality of force feeding and the stress and exertion of her activism took a toll on Lytton’s health, suffering a heart attack and then a stroke. But even while confined to her bed, she kept on helping in any way she could.

In her presentation Lyndsey introduced us to a fascinating individual, offering accounts of her strength and determination. We will now have to turn to Lyndsey’s book to continue discovering the life of such an exemplary woman.

More information about the book can be found at:

https://www.bitebackpublishing.com/books/lady-constance-lytton

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s