Nicoletta Demetriou, ‘Collecting music, collecting life stories: The Cypriot Fiddler Project.’

The OCLW started Michaelmas term with a wonderful talk by Nicoletta Demetriou who presented her work on ‘The Cypriot Fiddler project’. Demetriou introduced her research through her own life-story. It was as an ethnomusicologist studying at SOAS that she travelled to do her fieldwork in Cyprus in 2005 and first became aware of the gaps in the history of traditional Cypriot folk songs. The ‘seeds’ of this project were allowed to grow when Demetriou received a Wolfson Research Fellowship in 2012. In Cyprus, Demetriou developed a network of folk musicians, interviewing many of them to learn how music had been performed and to record their life-stories. She chose to conduct these interviews in a very open format, asking the men about their lives and letting them speak freely. This approach has resulted in a ‘mammoth’ collection of recordings that presents challenges (how to catalogue, what to cut), but in their depth and range they constitute a rich record of a ‘distinct professional class that has disappeared.’

The ‘Cypriot Fiddler project’ studies the lives of men of limited financial means who used to play the violin or the laouto whenever there was a need for musicians in traditional villages in Cyprus. Demetriou explained that women only trained as musicians if they were excluded from traditional female roles, as was the case of a blind female fiddler she interviewed. Training to become a fiddler took between 6 months to 1 year, during which time the student would mainly learn the ritual of the Cypriot wedding. Lessons were expensive, so most of the learning took place ‘on the spot’ at village festivals, fairs and weddings, where a player would be expected to play any song that was requested. Demetriou identified fiddlers as ‘a concrete professional class’ that existed until the 1960s. Various factors changed the role of tradition in the last half of the twentieth century: Cyprus’ independence from Britain in 1960, the societal changes caused by the de facto partition of 1974, and the overall modernisation of society. The 1930s had already seen changes in rural migration and labour consciousness, but it was only after the 1960s, particularly after 1974, that the political changes and the scale of urbanisation altered the landscape of folk music in the island. Fiddlers started finding no places to play – the village square was replaced by private venues as the location for weddings, and modern bands and DJ’s became the norm when music was needed.

The goal of the project is for the life stories of these musicians to be preserved as part of a group biography. Demetriou described her own role as that of an editor of the musicians’ own accounts of their lives. She hopes her work will convey the experience of the life of the fiddler, to understand why they chose to learn to play their instrument and what this life has meant to them. In this portrait, Demetriou also aims to convey what the fiddlers’ considered a good musician and how others in society viewed them. She stressed that this was not the story of individual musicians – it was the story of a country, and of a world that no longer exists.

Since many of her interviewees are quite old now, her priority at the moment is to put together a documentary in the hope that they can have the chance to see it. During the second half of her talk, Demetriou showed the first edits of a few of her interviews. These illustrated some of the particular challenges of such recordings, chief among them the question of translation. A poignant example was the phrase ‘making a wedding’ used by one of her interviewees in lieu of ‘playing at a wedding’, conveying the integral role of musicians in that traditional rite of passage. Another interviewee spoke of his music in terms of feeling satisfied, using a word that refers to having enough food which Demetriou chose to translate as ‘satiated’.

Having the opportunity to see clips from Demetriou’s research gave the audience a glimpse of the cultural richness collected in her work. Given the lively discussion after the talk, I am sure many of us will be looking out for Demetriou’s documentary when it is finished in early 2016.

To keep up to date with ‘The Cypriot Fiddler Project’, please follow this link to their Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/TheCypriotFiddler/timeline

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s