2017: Writing World Lives

Over four weeks between 24 January and 21 February 2017, OCLW hosted its prestigious annual series of Weinrebe Lectures on the subject of ‘Writing World Lives’.

You can listen to podcasts of the lectures by clicking through the links (If there is no link, then the decision was made to not record or podcast the lecture, either because of sound quality or because of permissions).

Tuesday 24 January, 5:30-7pm, LWA
Patrick French: ‘How to Write a World Life’

Patrick French is a British writer and historian, based in London and Delhi. He is the author of several books including: Younghusband: the Last Great Imperial Adventurer, about Francis Younghusband; The World Is What It Is, the authorised biography of Nobel Laureate V. S. Naipaul and winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; and India: a Portrait, a biography of 1.2 billion people.

Tuesday 31 January, 5:30-7pm, LWA
Elleke Boehmer: ‘Nelson Mandela: A World Life’

Elleke Boehmer is Professor of World Literature in English in the English Faculty, University of Oxford, and currently Director of the Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH). She is a founding figure in the field of colonial and postcolonial studies, and internationally known for her research in anglophone literatures of empire and anti-empire. She is an acclaimed novelist and short story writer, most recently of The Shouting in the Dark. She is the author of the cultural history, Nelson Mandela: A Very Short Introduction, Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors, and Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920 (all published by Oxford University Press).

Tuesday 7 February, 5:30-7pm, LWA
Roy Foster: ‘‘Doors into the Dark’: Seamus Heaney and his Worlds’

Roy Foster is the Carroll Professor of Irish History at Hertford College, Oxford. Professor Foster’s many books include biographies of politicians such as Charles Stewart Parnell and Lord Randolph Churchill, a large-scale history of Ireland from the 17th century, the two-volume biography of Yeats, and many essays on Irish culture and politics, including a book on the ‘Celtic Tiger’ phenomenon of the 1990s. A recent book, Words Alone: Yeats and his inheritances, presents a re-reading of Irish literary history throughout the nineteenth century. He is currently working on a history of Irish literature.

Tuesday 21 February, 5:30-7pm, LWA
Lyndal Roper: ‘Martin Luther, Difficult Hero’

Lyndal Roper is a Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, and the first woman to hold the Regius Chair in History. Her first book, The Holy Household. Women and Morals in Reformation Augsburg argued that the Reformation developed a theology of gender. Its attraction lay in its offer of the vision of a ‘holy household’ where the roles of men and women were clearly distinct. Oedipus and the Devil ranges through the literary culture of the sixteenth century to the use of psychoanalysis in studying witchcraft. Witch Craze argues that what powered the witch craze was a set of fears about fertility in the human and the natural world, and The Witch in the Western Imagination explores images of witches and witchcraft in art and literature. She is currently writing a biography of Martin Luther.

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